Stories from the Galapagos

The Galapagos travelers pose on the bow of the schooner.

The Galapagos travelers pose on the bow of the schooner.

Dear Friends:

It’s been over a month since I returned from the Galapagos Islands, and I am still  having fun with photographs, videos and memories of this incredible and amazing trip.   We had excellent company, a magnificent yacht & crew, and the natural world at our feet, pristine and engaging as very few places on earth still are.  Where else an you swim and play with turtles and sea lions in warm clear waters? Or watch magnificent sunsets and sunrises with a drink on hand, sharing stories of penguins and pelicans?  We took walks along sandy beaches festooned with nesting frigate birds in full mating colors, or along trails where courting blue footed boobies were dancing, one foot at a time in the air;  Or watched the arrival of the first dozen albatrosses, coming in for landing after a year at sea, wobbly and awkward, but eager to nest.  We celebrated our midway point at Cape Berkeley on the west coast of Isabella Island, right on the equator, with the GPS stuck at 00:00:00 – a remarkable set of numbers for a memorable cocktail hour.

Every day the cook produced elaborate meals, the stewards took care of our spotless air-conditioned cabins, the wetsuits were rinsed off and hanged to dry, beach towels always handy, drinks following swiftly, and all we had to do was swim, walk, enjoy life and smile!

Charles Darwin never had it this easy, but who could imagine a better way to celebrate 200 years of his birthday and 150 of the publication of “Origin of the Species”?  To top the fun sail, we learned a great deal about evolution, climate change, volcanoes and oceans, birds and sea creatures with our brilliant naturalist guide who also introduced us to the human history of the islands, from the life of the old settlers to the changes brought in by politics and tourism.

OCSC crew making a $1,000 donation to WildAid for the protection of the Galapagos sharks to stop the evil practice of "finning."

OCSC crew making a $1,000 donation to WildAid for the protection of the Galapagos sharks to stop the evil practice of "finning."

I truly recommend this trip to everyone, from age 6 to 90: it’s a lot of fun, it gets you close to nature like no other trip, and it’s run flawlessly.

Our next departure is this November ’09 you will have Greg Tarczynski, a well known professional photographer, as the trip leader, and he can help you with your photography!

You can ask me or my assistant, Tony Samour, for complete details. Explore on!

Anthony Sandberg
President & Founder