Day-Off Day Trip to Angel Island

Story by Monica Alicia Bland
Photos by Bill Kinney

The Annas hummingbird is aware (but not wary) of our presence. The light flints peacock green iridescence from her feathers with each staccato movement of her head. We are staring at her while she is staring at more important things. She ignores the shutter of the camera and our coos of delight, preens, and prepares to fly away. When she does finally go, we look after her contentedly. She has stayed long enough—longer, in fact, than we expected.

©Bill Kinney

A daytrip to Angel Island right now can feel like that—like you stayed longer than expected. This Tuesday we (OCSC Instructor Bill Kinney skippered for the trip) left at noon for a sail to Ayala Cove, docked at 1:30, went on a slow rantum scoot that lead us around the entire island, were back at the boat by 5:30, cooked, ate a leisurely meal, and cast off for a sail to home port. We put the boat away and had a celebratory toast in full daylight.

As you hike away from Ayala Cove, you’ll find nonchalant deer, the Juliet Fish Nichols fog bell, placards with historical facts, empty ruined buildings that are full of character, and baby pine trees lifing up around fire-scarred stumps. You’ll startle Scrub-jays and a few surly teenagers who jetski over from Tiburon. You’ll sigh and smile and point until you’ve had enough—and then you’ll remember you still have a lovely sail home to look forward to.

This is an easy trip (there are some fussy currents in the marina, but you’ll be motoring through them to dock). If you have a state park parking permit, you can dock for FREE. If not, docking is only $15 and you can stay until sunset. Since sunset comes after 8pm during the longest days of summer, now is the perfect time to book a full-day charter and explore Angel Island at your own pace! Be sure to bring a camera, plenty of water (there are several fountains along the trail if you forget), and a several layers of clothing. For more information about Angel Island, visit the official site: http://www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=468 and to book your next charter, give us a call at the club: (510) 843-4200.

See you on the water soon!
Monica

©Bill Kinney

©Bill Kinney

©Bill Kinney

©Bill Kinney

©Bill Kinney